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First 360-degree cameras in space end Flat Earthers' arguments once and for all

Annie Walton

Published 
| Last updated 

First 360-degree cameras in space end Flat Earthers' arguments once and for all

Featured Image Credit: SWNS

It's a bad day to be a Flat Earther.

Over the years, the conspiracy theorists have had to deal with a lot of evidence that contradicts their theories on the flatness of the Earth.

But the latest footage from space really does throw a spanner in the works. See for yourself:

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360 degree images captured in space show Earth in all its glory... and it's safe to say it looks pretty round to us.

The images come courtesy of the first 360 degree cameras sent to space, and they've captured some images that really show off how spherical the Earth truly is.

Chinese tech company Insta360 shared the images that got the whole internet talking.

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They show a round blue circle (that's Earth) and the surrounding darkness of infinite space.

The images were captured by two 360-degree cameras attached to satellites orbiting the earth.

The cameras were sent 310 miles into space on January 16 after beginning the project in July 2021.

Media Storm and SAR satellite company Spacety collaborated with the tech company to get the cameras as far into space as possible.

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The images show a very round looking Earth. Credit: SWNS
The images show a very round looking Earth. Credit: SWNS

The cameras had to undergo heavy reinforcing to ensure they could withstand the temperatures and conditions so far from earth.

Cameras had to be able to withstand both extreme heat and cold as the satellites were expected to pass between temperatures as low as -94 degrees F to as high as 122 degrees F depending on the location.

They also had to be radiation and vibration proof, which was particularly important during take off and landing.

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After initially being scheduled for launch in 2022 and postponed due to the pandemic, the launch took place earlier this year.

“The project runs on hard work, but a fair bit of luck, too,” Insta360 said.

“Space can be unpredictable, and there is no backup hardware or software if the camera runs into any issues.

"Luckily, both cameras and their sensors are still fully functioning and offer an incredible look at outer space.”

The satellites with the cameras on will continue orbiting the earth for two years, so we can expect more of these incredible photos to come.

The images contradict flat Earth theories. Credit: SWNS
The images contradict flat Earth theories. Credit: SWNS

After they've completed the mission, the satellites will fly off into space, where they'll be burned up.

There's no word yet on how the Flat Earthers are taking this devastating blow, but I'm sure some people will still find a way to argue it.

Topics: Technology, Space, Conspiracy Theories, NASA

Annie Walton
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