Neurosurgeon claims brain transplants are 'feasible' and would see people given 'entire new bodies'

Emily Brown

Published 
| Last updated 

Neurosurgeon claims brain transplants are 'feasible' and would see people given 'entire new bodies'

Featured Image Credit: REUTERS/Spotmatik/Alamy Stock Photo

A controversial neurosurgeon has claimed brain transplants are 'technically feasible' and would involve people being given entirely new bodies.

Forget anti-ageing moisturisers, healthy diets and hydration, because Sergio Canavero believes there could be an alternative route to tackle inevitable ageing. All you need is a quick brain transplant.

The Italian neurosurgeon made his latest claims last month in a paper called Whole brain transplantation in man: Technically feasible, which was published in the peer-reviewed journal Surgical Neurology International (SNI) - where, it's worth noting, Canavero serves as an associate editor.

Canavero believes brain transplants are 'feasible'. Credit: Science Photo Library / Alamy Stock Photo
Canavero believes brain transplants are 'feasible'. Credit: Science Photo Library / Alamy Stock Photo

In the paper, Canavero suggested it is time to 'explore other options' to 'successfully rejuvenate an aged body', and points to a project called Perseus as a possible solution.

According to the neurosurgeon, Perseus 'aims at moving an old brain into a young immunoconditioned body'.

The scientist describes how one could theoretically remove one person’s brain to place it into the skull of another body - either a clone, which would rely on another scientific breakthrough entirely, or a donated, brain-dead body.

The brain could apparently be removed with a 'robotic scoop with retractable tines', and Canevero also offers up potential solutions to other concerns, such as the reconnection of nerves.

Loading…

The goal of the project is to allow people to live more of their life in what he calls a 'pristine body'.

His idea for a brain transplant comes after Canavero previously proposed an entire head transplant, and made headlines for his 'success' in the area after he practised the operation on corpses.

Now, the neurosurgeon has told Motherboard head transplants 'work', and that his previous venture was just a stepping stone to a brain transplant.

Canavero has previously done research into head transplants. Credit: Pixabay
Canavero has previously done research into head transplants. Credit: Pixabay

He explained: “A human head transplant was the intermediate step towards a brain transplant. Since the latter is considered impossible, I decided to focus on HT [head transplant], which is far simpler.

"However, although I can tell you HT works, unfortunately it does not rejuvenate aged head tissues, including the eyes. BT [Brain transplant] is the only option.”

The scientist made reference to a head transplant project he took on in China, but told the publication he was not free to talk about it, 'other than saying it works'.

In his paper, he continues: "Contrary to common lore, a full [brain transplant] is achievable, at least theoretically.

"Of course, further extensive cadaveric rehearsals will be necessary, followed by tests in brain-dead organ donors... New surgical tools will have to be developed."

The neurosurgeon indicates there's just one thing standing in his way of performing a brain transplant, as he writes: "With appropriate funding, a long-held dream may finally come true.”

Topics: Technology, Science, Beauty

Emily Brown
More like this

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Film & TV

James Cameron recreates iconic Titanic scene with stunt doubles to see if Jack would have survived

9 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Die-hard Red Hot Chili Peppers fans vow to never see them perform again after their latest concert

16 hours ago