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2023 will be the hottest year recorded in history

Poppy Bilderbeck

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| Last updated 

2023 will be the hottest year recorded in history

Featured Image Credit: Tim Robberts/Sean Gladwell/Getty Images

The warmest year on record has been identified as 2023 - and here's what it all means.

If you've been looking back on 2023 and aren't a massive fan about how this year's turned out for you, at least you haven't had quite as bad a year as Earth has.

The Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) has revealed 2023 is going to be the warmest year on record and unless we make some pretty hefty new year's resolutions to how we treat our planet, here's what it could mean for its - and our - future.

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According to C3S, November 2023 was 'the warmest November globally in the ERA5 data record, going back to 1940'.

The average surface temperature in November 2023 stood at 14.22°C (57.6°F), the whole month was 1.75°C (35.15°F) over the average temperature from the years 1850 to 1900 - C3S' website states.

The latest monthly climate update by the service reveals: "Every month since June was the warmest, with the warmest boreal summer and autumn, making 2023 the warmest on record."

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Deputy director of C3S, Samantha Burgess says: "2023 has now had six record breaking months and two record breaking seasons.

November 2023 was the warmest November on record, dating back to 1940. Credit: Climate Copernicus
November 2023 was the warmest November on record, dating back to 1940. Credit: Climate Copernicus

"The extraordinary global November temperatures, including two days warmer than 2°C (35.6°F) above preindustrial, mean that 2023 is the warmest year in recorded history."

But what does this mean for the planet's future?

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Well, director of C3S Carlo Buontempo notes: "As long as greenhouse gas concentrations keep rising, we can’t expect different outcomes from those seen this year.

"The temperature will keep rising and so will the impacts of heatwaves and droughts. Reaching net zero as soon as possible is an effective way to manage our climate risks."

The World Meteorological Organization has also spoken out about 2023 'shattering' the climate record and what 'major impacts' it could have for Earth.

2023 will have been the hottest year on record. Credit: Getty Images/ Ana Fernandez/SOPA Images/LightRocket
2023 will have been the hottest year on record. Credit: Getty Images/ Ana Fernandez/SOPA Images/LightRocket
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United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres echoed Buontempo, urging leaders to commit at UN Climate Change negotiations, COP28 - currently taking place in the Middle East - to enact urgent changes.

He said, in a video message: "We have the roadmap to limit the rise in global temperature to 1.5°C (34.7°F) and avoid the worst of climate chaos.

"But we need leaders to fire the starting gun at COP28 on a race to keep the 1.5 (34.7) degree limit alive: By setting clear expectations for the next round of climate action plans and committing to the partnerships and finance to make them possible; By committing to triple renewables and double energy efficiency; And committing to phase out fossil fuels, with a clear time frame aligned to the 1.5-degree limit."

Topics: News, World News, Science, Weather, Environment

Poppy Bilderbeck
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