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Former Secret Service agent who was with JFK when he died raises new questions about his assassination

Former Secret Service agent who was with JFK when he died raises new questions about his assassination

Former Secret Service agent raised new questions about whether it was multiple people that shot JFK, and about the 'magic bullet' theory.

Former Secret Service agent, Paul Landis, has raised new questions about whether it was actually multiple people that shot JFK, and about the 'magic bullet' theory.

Now 88-years-old, Landis had the job of protecting the first lady, Jackie Kennedy, and was with JFK at the time of his death in 1963.

He recalls hearing and seeing the gunshot in Dealey Plaza, walking just feet away from the President at the time of the incident.

After the first shot, he heard two more, and saw Kennedy sprawled over in the back of the limousine.

Despite being there at the exact time of the shooting, Landis’ account of what happened differs from that which has been reported from the government’s official investigation.

In an interview with the New York Times, Landis claims that he picked up a bullet that was stuck in the back seat of the car where the President had been sitting, and placed it on the hospital stretcher for investigators to forensically examine.

However, he now believes that the bullet rolled onto the governor’s stretcher whilst the two were pushed together.

Former agent recalled having to duck out of the way to avoid being splattered by brains Credit History in HD on Unsplash
Former agent recalled having to duck out of the way to avoid being splattered by brains Credit History in HD on Unsplash

The bullet has been called 'magic' after managing to wound JFK’s throat, back, chest, wrist and thigh.

The 6.55mm bullet was one of three shot.

The first missed the open limousine completely, the second was 'the magic bulle', and the third was the fatal shot that struck him in the head.

What is a mystery is how he obtained the wrist, chest, back and thigh injuries.

After trying to recall what happened at the scene years later, but never being interviewed by the Warren Commission, Landis’ account of what happened has been skewed in recent times.

He said: “It was all going on so quickly.

The bullet has been called “magic” after managing to wound JFK’s throat, back, chest, wrist and thigh
Westlake Porter Public Library / Getty

“And I was just afraid that — it was a piece of evidence, that I realised right away. “

Very important, and I didn’t want it to disappear or get lost.

“So it was, ‘Paul, you’ve got to make a decision,’ and I grabbed it."

He has always believed, like everyone else, that Lee Harvey Oswald was the lone shooter, but recently he is doubting that version of events.

He said: “At this point, I’m beginning to doubt myself, now I begin to wonder.”

James Robenalt, a lawyer who has meticulously researched the assassination, said: “If the bullet we know as the magic or pristine bullet stopped in President Kennedy’s back, it means that the central thesis of the Warren Report, the single-bullet theory, is wrong.”

Featured Image Credit: Westlake Porter Public Library / Getty

Topics: US News, Crime, Conspiracy Theories