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Business sends company it owed money $23,000 in three tons worth of coins

Callum Jones

Published 
| Last updated 

Business sends company it owed money $23,000 in three tons worth of coins

Featured Image Credit: CBS Colorado

There are certainly many different ways you can pay a debt, but one business has made headlines after sending a company the money it was owed in three tons worth of coins.

According to plaintiffs involved with the case, the Northern Colorado welding business JMF Enterprises are trying to pay a subcontractor $23,500 debt in quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies.

The subcontractor, Fired Up Fabrication LLC, have since labeled the move as 'malicious' and 'a major F-U'.

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Danielle Beem, an attorney who represents Fired Up Fabrication LLC, added that the 6,500 pound coin delivery is 'a symbolic middle finger'.

"I think the thought was my clients would have to accept it and it's a giant waste of time and a major F-U," Beem said.

Court documents claim JMF Enterprises hired Fired Up Fabrication as a subcontractor to do welding work on an apartment building.

However, the two company's quickly went to war after Fired Up Fabrication filed a civil lawsuit claiming JMF had not paid them in full.

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That's a big delivery. Credit: CBS Colorado
That's a big delivery. Credit: CBS Colorado

But the two company's appeared to resolve their issues back in July as they went to mediation and agreed a solution to the dispute.

JMF agreed to pay the subcontractor $23,500, ultimately bringing an end to the financial dispute.

Within the settlement agreement, it did not specify how the money owed should be paid.

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But while you thought all may have been resolved, Beem said she got a call from the driver of a flatbed truck some six weeks ago who was delivering the settlement.

The driver was attempting to deliver a 2x3x4 box, which was filled with so many coins weighing 6,500 pounds.

Beem went on to say JMF's lawyer assured that the delivery did total $23,500 in coins though it required 'a forklift to move'.

Danielle Beem labelled the delivery as 'malicious'. Credit: CBS Colorado
Danielle Beem labelled the delivery as 'malicious'. Credit: CBS Colorado
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However, Beem said she couldn't accept the coins as the freight elevator in the Denver office building couldn't carry more than 3,000 pounds.

"Even if I wanted to take this box of coins, I had no way of doing so," she told CBS News Colorado.

"It's funny. As long as it's not happening to you," Beem added.

In court pleadings, JMF's attorney wrote, "the coins, being current coin of the realm, constituted a tender of the settlement funds, and therefore, JMF has complied with the terms of the agreement. The settlement agreement did not outline any specific form for the payment."

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UNILAD has reached out to JMF's attorney for comment.

Topics: News, US News, Business, Money

Callum Jones
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