To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK
Advert
Advert
Advert

Radio signals from galaxy nearly nine billion light-years away received by scientist on Earth

Gregory Robinson

Published 
| Last updated 

Radio signals from galaxy nearly nine billion light-years away received by scientist on Earth

Featured Image Credit: Iuliia Bycheva / Charles Stirling / Alamy Stock Photo

A radio signal from a galaxy nine billion light-years away from Earth has been received by scientists.

In what is an incredible discovery that could lead to scientists learning more about the universe's early years, the signal was detected by a unique wavelength known as a '21 centimeter line' or the 'hydrogen line'.

Because hydrogen is spread out across the universe, it's a way for scientists to map-out and identify the location of galaxies.

Advert

Astronomers use radio telescopes to pick up 21-cm line wavelength signals to map the universe.

This wavelength is reportedly emitted by neutral hydrogen atoms, Space.com said on Friday (20 January).

Earth. Credit: Alexey Kotelnikov / Alamy Stock Photo
Earth. Credit: Alexey Kotelnikov / Alamy Stock Photo

Scientists in Canada and India captured the signal from a 'star-forming galaxy' with the rather complicated name, 'SDSSJ0826+5630' by using a huge telescope in India.

Advert

Researches used the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope.

The signal was emitted when the Milky Way, the 13.8 billion-year-old galaxy where are home planet resides - was only 4.9 billion years old.

Loading…

“It’s the equivalent to a look-back in time of 8.8 billion years,” author and McGill University Department of Physics post-doctoral cosmologist Arnab Chakraborty shared in a statement.

Advert

Until recently, 21-cm-wavelength radio waves had only been recorded from nearby galaxies.

“A galaxy emits different kinds of radio signals," he said. "Until now, it’s only been possible to capture this particular signal from a galaxy nearby, limiting our knowledge to those galaxies closer to Earth.”

The radio signal from the distant galaxy. Credit: Chakraborty & Roy/NCRA-TIFR/GMRT
The radio signal from the distant galaxy. Credit: Chakraborty & Roy/NCRA-TIFR/GMRT

It's the first time a signal of this type has been detected from such a huge distance.

Advert

The incredible discovery was announced last week in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society Journal.

The naturally occurring phenomenon known as gravitational lensing helped scientists capture the signal.

The study's co-author Nirupam Roy said: "Gravitational lensing magnifies the signal coming from a distant object to help us peer into the early universe."

This signal was bent by the presence of another galaxy and magnified, allowing the telescope to pick it up, in this case.

Advert

Researches were able to measure the fas composition of the far away galaxy the signal came from by thanks to the signal itself.

The discovery let scientists look back 8.8 billion years. Credit: dotted zebra / Alamy Stock Photo
The discovery let scientists look back 8.8 billion years. Credit: dotted zebra / Alamy Stock Photo

They found that the atomic mass of the fas content of distant galaxy was almost twice the mass of the stars visible to us.

Although this means aliens didn't contact Earth on this occasion, the signal is still a huge discovery in helping scientists understand how stars and galaxies evolve.

Topics: News, Science, Space

Gregory Robinson
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

News

Woman, 54, defends 21-year age gap with husband claiming older men are ‘boring’ and can’t keep up'

a minute ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Woman used to love her name until Amazon 'ruined it' and people made fun of her all the time

an hour ago