Advert

Inside 'Most Depressing City On Earth' With -30C Temps And Blood-Red River

Published 
| Last updated 

Inside 'Most Depressing City On Earth' With -30C Temps And Blood-Red River

An isolated city in Russia has been branded ‘the most depressing on earth’ thanks to its -30C temperatures, days-long periods of darkness, low life expectancy and blood red river. 

Built on a former Soviet prison camp, Norilsk is one of the world’s most northerly cities and can be found in the Krasnoyarsk Krai region of Siberia, eastern Russia. 

Each year, Norilsk experiences 45 days of continuous darkness, with pollution levels making 59 the average age city dwellers reach, 10 years lower than the Russia average life expectancy.

Advert
An isolated city in Russia has been branded ‘the most depressing on earth’. Credit: Shutterstock
An isolated city in Russia has been branded ‘the most depressing on earth’. Credit: Shutterstock

Norilsk’s river remains a sinister shade of red two years on from a 21,000 tonne diesel spill from a collapsed oil tank reservoir.

Meanwhile, January temperatures drop to an average low of -30C, while record lows have plummeted to a bone-chilling -53.1C.

More than 170,000 people live in Norilsk, which has only one freight railway running in and out, and the city only got proper internet access in 2017.

Advert

No roads lead to Norilsk - which is snow-covered for two thirds of the year - and although the port city of Dudinka is only 40 miles away, the sea freezes over in winter, stopping access. 

The only way in and out of the city year-round is via a five-hour flight from Moscow, which is situated a whopping 1,800 miles away.

Norilsk's river water has turned red on several occasions. Credit: Facebook/Typical Norilsk
Norilsk's river water has turned red on several occasions. Credit: Facebook/Typical Norilsk
Credit: Shutterstock
Credit: Shutterstock
Advert

Norilsk sits on the planet’s biggest nickel-copper-palladium deposit, which piqued the interest of a 20th century geologist who discovered the deposits in the Putorana Mountains foothills. 

Norilsk’s nickel plant produces a fifth of the world’s nickel and almost all residents have a connection to it.

However, the plant is the cause of catastrophic pollution in Norilsk, which is one of Russia's most polluted cities.

Each year Norilsk experiences 45 days of continuous darkness. Credit: Shutterstock
Each year Norilsk experiences 45 days of continuous darkness. Credit: Shutterstock
Advert

The plant pumps out more than two million tonnes of toxic gas each year - including nitrogen oxides, carbon, phenols and sulphur dioxide - which has taken a horrific toll on Norilsk’s residents. 

Rates of cancer in Norilsk are double those of the rest of Russia and blood illness rates of Norilsk children are 44 percent higher than the average Siberian child. 

The rates of nervous system conditions among the young are 38 percent higher, while muscle illnesses are 28 percent higher.

What’s more, approximately one percent of all of the planet’s sulphur dioxide emissions come solely from Norilsk and the chemical compound’s outpouring kills trees and causes acid rain.

Advert

If you have a story you want to tell, send it to UNILAD via [email protected] 

Featured Image Credit: Alamy/Facebook/Typical Norilsk

Topics: News, Russia, Travel

Aisha Nozari
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Politics

Trump's final days in office under scrutiny as part of federal investigation

11 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Anne Heche will be taken off life support after organ donor recipient was found

4 hours ago