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New York gets new cat tzar as city struggles to combat tsunami of rats taking over the city

Charisa Bossinakis

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| Last updated 

New York gets new cat tzar as city struggles to combat tsunami of rats taking over the city

Featured Image Credit: Twitter/The Recount. Cavan Images / Alamy Stock Photo

New York has appointed its first-ever cat tzar as the city continues to struggle with roaming rats.

I smell a rat, no literally...

The New York Times reported that Kathleen Corradi, an educator and land use and sustainability expert with the city’s Education Department, has landed the new job of curbing the Big Apple’s tsunami of rodents.

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She’s the thing that vermin have nightmares about - to put it plainly.

NYC Mayor Eric Adams introduced Ms Corradi, the former elementary teacher, to the public, describing her as a ‘maestro’ who would see New York looking much cleaner.

The city began it journey of looking for a cat tzar last year.

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According to the Guardian, Mayor Adams posted the job listing that said his department was looking for someone ‘somewhat bloodthirsty’, with excellent communication skills and a 'general aura of bada**ery’.

“The ideal candidate is highly-motivated and somewhat bloodthirsty, determined to look at all solutions from various angles, including improving operational efficiency, data collection, technology innovation, trash management and wholesale slaughter,” the ad read.

Credit: Orjan Ellingvag / Alamy Stock Photo
Credit: Orjan Ellingvag / Alamy Stock Photo

Now, Ms Corradi will be going up against the city’s slew of rats alongside the city’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene and renowned urban rodentologist Robert Corrigan, who has begun installing movement sensors on city streets to monitor rat behavior.

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“You’ll be seeing a lot of me and lot less rats,” said Ms Corradi, who will be paid $155,000 a year, as per The New York Times.

Hell, if I’d be getting paid six figures, sign me up!

New York City has been trying to resolve its growing rat population for quite some time, as rodents in public spaces such as parks and subways have only increased.

Over the past year, locals have reported almost 3.2 million sightings to the city’s 311 service request line, clipping the record-breaking number of complaints made in 2021, according to Fortune.

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According to city data, the number of rat sightings documented by city inspectors also doubled last year.

This could be partially due to the cutback in sanitation services related to budget cuts during the pandemic, which Mayor Adams has tried to reverse.

But it’s proven to be a pesky problem.

“Rats have proven to be one of the most formidable opponents that humans have faced. Here in New York City, we’re locked in a constant battle,” said council member Erik Bottcher, whose district includes Times Square, as per Fortune.

Topics: News, Politics, Animals

Charisa Bossinakis
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