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Mum Left Horrified After Reading Son's Autopsy Report Following Navy SEAL ‘Hell Week’ Training

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Mum Left Horrified After Reading Son's Autopsy Report Following Navy SEAL ‘Hell Week’ Training

The mother of Kyle Mullen, who died after completing 'Hell Week' of the US Navy SEAL training, has been left 'horrified' by his autopsy report.

Having now read his official autopsy report, his mum Regina says she is 'horrified' at the way he was treated.

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She wants the people in charge of training when her son died to be held to account and for there to be permanent oversight on the Hell Week part of the training.

Calling her son's treatment and death a 'disgrace to the country', she is waiting on the results of an investigation into his death by the Naval Criminal Investigative Service.

Regina has said she wants them 'all in jail' and 'never able to work in the Navy' again after her son died under their supervision.

Promising not to stop in her pursuit of justice, she said the circumstances around her son's death were 'like murder to me and no one seems to care'.

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According to Stripes, the autopsy report states that Kyle had completed Hell Week and 'was being looked after by non-medical personnel to help him tend to his basic needs'.

It describes how the 24-year-old 'was in a wheelchair most of the time' as he was 'unable to stand and walk on his own'.

Kyle had also reportedly been coughing up large amounts of 'red-tinged fluid' which got to such large amounts that it 'nearly filled a 36 oz. sports drink bottle'.

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Regina described how her son had talked last August about 'mistreatment' during training exercises, and that she had facetimed him in January only to see his face was 'swollen' and 'he'd been spitting up blood'.

She also remembered a phone call with her son the day he completed Hell Week where she told her son 'you don't sound good' and asked him what was wrong.

US Navy SEALs have to complete a gruelling regime of training. Credit: Alamy
US Navy SEALs have to complete a gruelling regime of training. Credit: Alamy

Hell Week follows several weeks of boot camp training and is designed to push candidates for the Navy SEALs to their 'physical and mental limits'.

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Only around one in five candidates makes it through the gruelling training, which involves a series of high intensity exercises with few opportunities for sleep.

On average between 200 and 250 candidates pass the training and become fully fledged Navy SEALs each year.

According to NBC News, as many as 17 SEAL candidates have died in training accidents during the past couple of decades.

If you have experienced a bereavement and would like to speak with someone in confidence contact Cruse Bereavement Care via their national helpline on 0808 808 1677.

Featured Image Credit: Kyle Mullen Memorial Fund/Facebook/Alamy

Topics: News, US News

Joe Harker

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