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Home Of Serial Killer Dean Corll Who Murdered People Inside Goes On Sale

Cameron Frew

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Home Of Serial Killer Dean Corll Who Murdered People Inside Goes On Sale

Featured Image Credit: Alamy/Zillow

A home that once belonged to one of Houston's most infamous serial killers is up for sale.

Dean Corll abducted, raped, tortured, and murdered at least 28 teenage boys and young men between 1970 and 1973 in Houston and Pasadena, Texas. 

He was known locally as the 'Candy Man' because his family earlier owned a candy factory in Houston Heights, and he used to give out free sweets to the local children.

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Police were still looking for victims of Corll in his homes as recently as last year. Find out more below:

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Corll was often aided by David Owen Brooks and Elmer Wayne Henley, two teenage accomplices who'd help to lure his victims back to one of several homes he resided in, where they were tortured and killed by strangulation or a gunshot.

Henley ended up killing Corll after he woke up gagged with his ankles tied together. The pair then pleaded guilty to several murders and were handed life sentences.

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Now, one of the Candy Man's addresses is up for sale: specifically, 2020 Lamar Drive in Pasadena. Nearly 50 years after the killings, you can own 1,231 square feet of property with a grisly past - your own little American Horror Story, some might say.

The home comes with three beds and a grisly past. Credit: Zillow
The home comes with three beds and a grisly past. Credit: Zillow

It costs just $184,900, comes with three beds and a full bathtub, and would be perfect for a single family completely oblivious to who lived there before.

The listing's description reads: "Welcome to this newly renovated home located in Pasadena. Brands new flooring throughout the house.

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"Fresh paint makes the house feel more warm and welcoming. New countertops in the kitchen. Big backyard to host and family and friends. Pasadena ISD. Schedule your showing today."

Curiously - and understandably - there's absolutely no mention of Corll murdering young boys in the house.

While there'll likely be a true crime obsessive out there who'd get a kick out of staying in such a house, most people aren't keen.

Realtors in Texas don't have to tell people about past murderers living in their homes. Credit: Zillow
Realtors in Texas don't have to tell people about past murderers living in their homes. Credit: Zillow
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One user wrote: "They should tear down the house out of respect for the victims and their families. Just like they do to all other homes were hideous crimes were committed."

Others have expressed interest in visiting the home to see if there'd be any paranormal activity as a result of the gruesome deaths committed there.

According to Died in House, a Facebook page with interests which speak for itself: "In Texas, a seller and agent has no duty to make a disclosure or release information related to whether a death by natural causes, suicide, or accident unrelated to the condition of the property occurred on the property."

If you have a story you want to tell, send it to UNILAD via [email protected]  

Topics: News, US News

Cameron Frew
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