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SpaceX rocket boosters land back on Earth in stunning video that's leaving people 'beyond amazed'

SpaceX rocket boosters land back on Earth in stunning video that's leaving people 'beyond amazed'

The rocket carried the last of a number of satellites designed to improve weather forecasting

Footage of two SpaceX boosters making a smooth and controlled landing back to Earth after sending up a spacecraft has left people amazed.

The video was recorded after a SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket lifted off from Kennedy Space Center’s Launch Complex on Tuesday, 25 June, carrying the final spacecraft in a series of weather satellites.

Named GOES-U, the final satellite completes the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) R series of satellites which are intended to improve weather forecasting.

Ken Graham, director of the National Weather Service, described the satellites as a 'gamechanger' at a press briefing on Monday, saying: "Since the first launch of the series in 2016, the latest series of GOES has enabled new and improved forecasts, warnings and services to help save lives and protect property.”

The GOES-U launch was 10th for the Falcon Heavy, and the second contracted by NASA. The Falcon Heavy is made up of three Falcon 9 rocket first stages, giving the craft three times the lift to carry the satellite into space.

The boosters landed at SpaceX's landing zones. (X/@StarFleetTours)
The boosters landed at SpaceX's landing zones. (X/@StarFleetTours)

Though the possibilities provided by the satellites are particularly exciting for meteorologists, it was the parts that returned to Earth that got people talking online.

Elon Musk, whose company SpaceX created the spacecraft, shared a video online showing two side boosters seamlessly returning to Earth after detaching from the Falcon Heavy rocket.

One of the cores can be seen igniting as it approached the Earth, shortly followed by the second a few moments later.

The cores slowed as they neared the ground, before slowly landing upright as intended at SpaceX's Landing Zones 1 and 2 at Cape Canaveral Space Force Station, causing two sonic booms.

The impressive footage has been praised by viewers on X, one of who commented: "Beyond amazed to [see] this. Never gets old!"

The rocket featured three Space 9s. (MIGUEL J. RODRIGUEZ CARRILLO/AFP via Getty Images)
The rocket featured three Space 9s. (MIGUEL J. RODRIGUEZ CARRILLO/AFP via Getty Images)

"As a lifelong sci-fi fan, this is really quite moving," another wrote, adding: "Look what we humans can do! The universe awaits..."

"I will forever be amazed at the engineering this requires," wrote a third.

One viewer even suggested the video could offer a glimpse into our future beyond Earth, as they commented: "So impressive. This is how we become a space-faring civilization."

The satellites will move 22,236 miles above the Earth's equator, moving in sync with the speed of the planet to allow for continuous coverage over the areas below.

With the weather satellites now in place, meteorologists hope to be able to detect storms sooner and have more time to warn the public of approaching threats.

Featured Image Credit: X/@StarFleetTours

Topics: Space, Weather, Elon Musk