United Airlines plane forced to make emergency landing after sparks and debris start flying off it

Anish Vij

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United Airlines plane forced to make emergency landing after sparks and debris start flying off it

Featured Image Credit: @rawsalerts/Twiter

A United Airlines jet was forced to make an emergency landing after sparks and debris dramatically fell from the aircraft onto the ground.

The Newark to Sao Paulo flight took off at 11.24pm on Wednesday night (21 September) and after approximately an hour and a half of flying, the aircraft was recalled back to Newark Airport due to an apparent issue.

Watch terrifying footage of the incident below:

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As shown in the clip above, you can see the sparks and debris coming off the Boeing 777-200ER.

The issue was believed to to have related to a hydraulic pressure pump failure, however, investigations from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) remain ongoing.

Credit: @rawsalerts/Twiter
Credit: @rawsalerts/Twiter

United Airlines said in a statement: “After our aircraft experienced a mechanical issue shortly after takeoff, it remained in the air to burn fuel and then landed safely.

“Passengers deplaned at the gate and a new aircraft is scheduled to depart this morning.”

FAA told LADbible: "United Airlines Flight 149, a Boeing 777-200, landed safely at Newark Liberty International Airport shortly before 1 a.m. local time today after the crew reported an emergency.

"The flight departed Newark and was headed to São Paulo, Brazil before it returned. The FAA will investigate."

UNILAD have contacted United Airlines for comment.

Credit: @rawsalerts/Twiter
Credit: @rawsalerts/Twiter

United Airlines have recently placed deposits on 20 aircrafts capable of travelling at supersonic speeds, which will mean that a journey from London to New York will take just three and a half hours.

The aircraft is dubbed as the Boom Supersonic and the airline say it will fly at twice the speed of today’s planes and is designed to run on 100 percent sustainable aviation fuel (SAF).

A statement from United Airlines said: "Among the many future potential routes for United are Newark to London in just three and a half hours, Newark to Frankfurt in four hours and San Francisco to Tokyo in just six hours.

"Overture will also be designed with features such as in-seat entertainment screens, ample personal space, and contactless technology."

Credit: United Airlines/Boom Supersonic
Credit: United Airlines/Boom Supersonic

Blake Scholl, the founder and CEO of Boom Supersonic, said: "The world's first purchase agreement for net-zero carbon supersonic aircraft marks a significant step toward our mission to create a more accessible world.

"United and Boom share a common purpose - to unite the world safely and sustainably.

"At speeds twice as fast, United passengers will experience all the advantages of life lived in person, from deeper, more productive business relationships to longer, more relaxing vacations to far-off destinations."

Credit: United Airlines/Boom Supersonic
Credit: United Airlines/Boom Supersonic

United's CEO Scott Kirby added: "United continues on its trajectory to build a more innovative, sustainable airline, and today's advancements in technology are making it more viable for that to include supersonic planes.

"Boom's vision for the future of commercial aviation, combined with the industry's most robust route network in the world, will give business and leisure travelers access to a stellar flight experience. 

"Our mission has always been about connecting people and now, working with Boom, we'll be able to do that on an even greater scale."

The airline promises that the Boom Supersonic will be ready to go by 2029.

If you have a story you want to tell, send it to UNILAD via [email protected]  

Topics: News, Travel, US News

Anish Vij
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