To make sure you never miss out on your favourite NEW stories, we're happy to send you some reminders

Click 'OK' then 'Allow' to enable notifications

Not now
OK
Advert
Advert
Advert

Terrifying timelapse shows what a ‘true psychopath’ looks like during 2-hour interrogation

Kit Roberts

Published 
| Last updated 

Terrifying timelapse shows what a ‘true psychopath’ looks like during 2-hour interrogation

Featured Image Credit: Macon Police Department

Of all the groups of people who are more than a little disturbing to speak to, murderers have got to be up there.

We're not talking about someone who has acted in self defence, or who killed someone in a tragic accident, we're talking about cold, calculated murder.

Whether it's an apparent lack of remorse over their actions, or some of the reasons why they decided to kill, killers hold a macabre fascination.

Advert

A video has resurfaced online which shows murderer Stephen McDaniel during a police interrogation, and it has got people very freaked out by how McDaniel - who was later imprisoned for the murder of 27-year-old Lauren Giddings - was behaving.

Loading…

McDaniel killed Giddings on 26 June 2011 in Macon, Georgia. He used a master key to enter into her apartment. There he strangled her in her bedroom wearing gloves and a mask.

He then used a hacksaw to dismember Giddings' corpse, and concealed it in several locations, with her torso being concealed in a bin.

Advert

What has people freaked out was how seemingly impassive McDaniel appears over the course of a two hour interview.

The video is sped up into a time lapse, and shows just how little McDaniel moves during the course of the interrogation. While the police officers performing the interrogation continually shift in their seats, leaning back and forward, McDaniel appears to barely move at all.

Stephen McDaniel was impassive in his police interview. Credit: Macon Police Department
Stephen McDaniel was impassive in his police interview. Credit: Macon Police Department

In fact, the most movement that the killer appears to do in the entire two-hour-long time lapse is to place his hands on the table, and to take them off again.

Advert

Other than that, the only movement is his head as it follows the officers around the room. The motion seems almost robotic.

Despite the disturbing display in the police interview, McDaniel was not always so unflappable when being confronted with the evidence of his crime.

After the disappearance of Giddings, local news media got wind of the story and began interviewing Giddings' neighbours.

Among the neighbours who were interviewed was McDaniel.

Advert
Stephen McDaniel was being interviewed on local TV when he found out his victim's body was found. Credit: Macon Telegraph
Stephen McDaniel was being interviewed on local TV when he found out his victim's body was found. Credit: Macon Telegraph

He becomes visibly shaken by the news, and even ends the interview, saying 'I need to sit down' as he walks off.

Initially, his reaction was explained as being the shock of losing a friend. However, just one day later he became a suspect in the case.

Advert

The discovery that the police had made was in fact her torso, which he had concealed after dismembering her body. Evidence began to emerge from his computer, including posts on message boards about how he hated women and wanted to hurt them.

After confessing to the murder, he was sentenced to life in prison.

Topics: News, US News, True crime, Crime

Kit Roberts
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Celebrity

Crowd shocked as Tommy Lee pulls out his 'wiener' during middle of concert

an hour ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

MIT student creates device that is able to search the entire internet using just his mind

2 days ago