Advert

Covid Pass Blunder Could Ban You From Travelling To Holiday Hotspots

Published 
| Last updated 

Covid Pass Blunder Could Ban You From Travelling To Holiday Hotspots

A blunder with Covid vaccine records means that some people may not be able to go ahead with their travel plans.

According to reports, more than one million vaccine records contained errors, resulting in thousands being turned away from their desired destination and the possibility of more refusals in future.

NHS App (Alamy)
NHS App (Alamy)
Advert

The issue occurred when data relating to people's jabs was either missing or entered incorrectly when it was submitted into the centralised database.

This meant that Covid vaccine passes were not available to many, even if they were double-jabbed.

Covid passes are supposed to be available through the NHS app, and proof of vaccination is required by a long list of countries.

According to the Telegraph, 1,072,070 Covid vaccine records have had to be corrected.

Advert

However, the actual number is estimated to be higher, with more than 200,000 records needing alteration last year before the summer holidays.

Some people have even had to resort to getting a third jab after they were unable to get their vaccine records updated.

One person reportedly attempted to update their record 100 times, after only one of their jabs were recorded.

NHS Weight Loss Injection. Credit: Alamy
NHS Weight Loss Injection. Credit: Alamy
Advert

Last August, in an effort to rectify the issues, the NHS launched a Vaccine Data Resolution Service, which has resolved 184,000 such cases.

However, with experts from some countries suggesting that vaccine passports should also include records of booster jabs, this administrative issue could be far from over.

In Canada, Dr. Peter Juni of the Ontario COVID-19 Science Advisory Table claimed that any decision to add booster jabs to vaccine passports needed to be made quickly.

He explained, 'If we would want to change our definitions for a vaccine certificate from two to three doses, it would need to be done very swiftly'.

Advert

Juni went on to add, 'It wouldn't make sense if we start to implement something like that only [in the] second half of March. That's too late.'

Echoing the belief that the approach to tracking Omicron needs to be change, Dr Theresa Tam added, 'What we need to do going forward, as we emerge out of this Omicron wave, is recognise this virus is not going to disappear. We need to be able to address the ongoing presence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in a more sustainable way.'

If you have a story you want to tell, send it to UNILAD via [email protected]  

Featured Image Credit: Alamy

Topics: News, UK News, World News, Travel

Shola Lee
More like this
Advert
Advert
Advert

Chosen for YouChosen for You

Politics

Trump's final days in office under scrutiny as part of federal investigation

8 hours ago

Most Read StoriesMost Read

Anne Heche will be taken off life support after organ donor recipient was found

2 hours ago